Tag: Tests (Medical)

How Across America, Schools Cram for Their Covid-19 Tests

How Across America, Schools Cram for Their Covid-19 Tests

SAN ANTONIO — One recent Thursday, Ciara Brown, a junior at Fox Tech High School in San Antonio, stepped up to a small white table, pulled down her face mask and took a test that is still far from standard in American schools: a cotton swab up the nose. “Testing

Seeking Early Signals of Dementia in Driving and Credit Scores

Seeking Early Signals of Dementia in Driving and Credit Scores

That leaves methods that are invasive, like spinal taps, or expensive, like PET scans. These approaches can’t be used to screen large groups of people. “They’re not available everywhere,” Ms. Bayat said. “They’re not very accessible or scalable.” But a GPS device in someone’s car could monitor driving behavior almost

This Breast Cancer Gene Is Less Well Known, but Nearly as Dangerous

This Breast Cancer Gene Is Less Well Known, but Nearly as Dangerous

Heidi Marsh, 46, of Seattle, tested positive for the PALB2 mutation after her mother — a breast cancer and pancreatic cancer patient — was found to have it. She said her own doctor was unaware of the gene. “My OB-GYN was aware of my mom’s history and never suggested genetic

For Seniors Especially, Covid Can Be Stealthy

For Seniors Especially, Covid Can Be Stealthy

“We’re not necessarily surprised by this,” said Dr. Maria Carney, a geriatrician and an author of the Northwell study. “Older adults don’t always present like other adults. They may not mount a fever. Their metabolisms are different.” Younger diabetics, for instance, may become sweaty and experience palpitations if their blood

COVID-19 ADVICES

Wear a mask, get COVID-19 vaccine, stay at least 6 feet apart, avoid crowds, and wash your hands to protect against COVID-19.

 

It’s critical to keep taking precautions to prevent COVID-19. Use masks to slow the spread.
COVID-19 vaccines are effective at protecting you from getting sick. Based on what we know about COVID-19 vaccines, people who have been fully vaccinated can start to do some things that they had stopped doing because of the pandemic.
We’re still learning how vaccines will affect the spread of COVID-19. After you’ve been fully vaccinated against COVID-19, you should keep taking precautions in public places like wearing a mask, staying 6 feet apart from others, and avoiding crowds and poorly ventilated spaces until we know more.

For more information, Please refer to the CDC.