Tag: Labeling and Labels (Product)

How an Unproven Alzheimer’s Drug Got Approved

How an Unproven Alzheimer’s Drug Got Approved

The idea of accelerated approval came up briefly toward the end, raised by Dr. Rick Pazdur, head of F.D.A.’s oncology center, who was not a council member. It was not discussed in detail, but after the meeting, given the council’s rejection of standard approval, accelerated approval appeared to be the

Is Chlorophyll Water Really Good For You?

Is Chlorophyll Water Really Good For You?

This story was originally published on Nov. 15, 2019 in Styles. It has been updated to reflect the latest developments. On TikTok, young people with glowing skin can be seen sipping magic green potions. After adding a few drops of liquid chlorophyll to glasses of water, they drink, and poof!

Many Alzheimer’s Experts Say Use of Aduhelm Should Be Sharply Limited

Many Alzheimer’s Experts Say Use of Aduhelm Should Be Sharply Limited

Dr. Salloway, a site principal investigator for trials of the drug, wasn’t paid for that work but has received research and consulting fees from Biogen. He said doctors should use the drug only for patients whose statuses match those in the clinical trials. “There’s no evidence that it could be

Are Natural Deodorants Better for You?

Are Natural Deodorants Better for You?

She did note that the link between aluminum and Alzheimer’s is challenging to study because aluminum is the third most common element in the Earth’s crust, which means that everyone is exposed to it in small quantities. “We believe it’s important for people to have choices to find the everyday

5 Takeaways From the New Food Allergy Law

5 Takeaways From the New Food Allergy Law

The ingredient must be listed on labels starting in 2023. It may be a while before you see the effects of the FASTER Act. The law gives manufacturers 20 months to make sure any products they’re making that include sesame reflect that on packaging. Starting on January 1, 2023, if

COVID-19 ADVICES

Wear a mask, get COVID-19 vaccine, stay at least 6 feet apart, avoid crowds, and wash your hands to protect against COVID-19.

 

It’s critical to keep taking precautions to prevent COVID-19. Use masks to slow the spread.
COVID-19 vaccines are effective at protecting you from getting sick. Based on what we know about COVID-19 vaccines, people who have been fully vaccinated can start to do some things that they had stopped doing because of the pandemic.
We’re still learning how vaccines will affect the spread of COVID-19. After you’ve been fully vaccinated against COVID-19, you should keep taking precautions in public places like wearing a mask, staying 6 feet apart from others, and avoiding crowds and poorly ventilated spaces until we know more.

For more information, Please refer to the CDC.